Resources

Here are links to resources that we reference in our training or useful information for you to further your knowledge:

The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys

Empower black boys to dream, believe, achieve
Schools that routinely fail Black boys are not extraordinary. In fact, they are all-too ordinary. If we are to succeed in positively shifting outcomes for Black boys and young men, we must first change the way school is “done.” That’s where the eight in ten teachers who are White women fit in . . . and this urgently needed resource is written specifically for them as a way to help them understand, respect and connect with all of their students. 
So much more than a call to call to action—but that, too!—The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys brings together research, activities, personal stories, and video interviews to help us all embrace the deep realities and thrilling potential of this crucial American task. With Eddie, Ali, and Marguerite as your mentors, you will learn how to:

  • Develop learning environments that help Black boys feel a sense of belonging, nurturance, challenge, and love at school
  • Change school culture so that Black boys can show up in the wholeness of their selves 
  • Overcome your unconscious bias and forge authentic connections with your Black male students

If you are a teacher who is afraid to talk about race, that’s okay. Fear is a normal human emotion and racial competence is a skill that can be learned. We promise that reading this extraordinary guide will be a life-changing first step forward . . . for both you and the students you serve.

Social Justice Books is a site with a collection of great books for young readers. The best selection of multicultural and social justice books for children, YA, and educators. CLICK HERE.

PARENTS: Here is a resource for parents to talk to young children about race. The site Raising Race Conscious Children is a great website with resources for parents or teachers. CLICK HERE

I had the honor to meet Dr. Joy DeGruy author of “Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome” and here is a link to one of her many presentations. She suggests that we don’t have to always agree, but stay in the room with each other to keep learning from one another. Check her out for sure. Click HERE:

A microaggression can be rooted in racism, sexism, or discrimination based on nationality or sexual orientation. It can be delivered casually or even unconsciously. And it can unleash effects that add up over time. Check out this video of common, and often overlooked, examples of microaggressions. Are you guilty of any of these? See for yourself HERE.

Check out this synopsis of Robin DiAngelo’s book “White Fragility” HERE

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